Year Intern Home Institution/ Major(s) Project Supervisor
2010

Keya Jackson

Internship through NOAA UMES - Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center (LMRCSC)

 

Hampton University/ Marine and Environmental Science

Title: Size dependent burrowing competence of North American blue mud shrimp, Upogebia pugettensis

Summary: Mud shrimp, Upogebia pugettensis, are native members of the benthic community in estuaries along the west coast of the US and are considered to be ecological engineers that promote nitrogen and carbon cycling. On intertidal estuarine mudflats, Upogebia aggregate into dense beds, constructing extensive burrows. Burrowing shrimp depend on their burrows to survive and thus shrimp reburrowing competence indicates the shrimp’s ability to emigrate away from their burrows. Common assumptions and anecdotes suggest that post larval Upogebia redistribute in estuaries after initial settlement. I spent the summer investigating shrimp resettlement and and testing reburrowing competence in transplanted shrimp in mudflats.

John Chapman, Research Associate, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and Brett Dumbauld, Research Ecologist, USDA-Agriculture Research Service

Paula Marshall

Internship through COSIA Teacher Internship Program

 

Wilson College/ Education

Title: COSIA Intern, Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences

Summary: This summer I participated in the introductory training about estuarine ecosystems, the rocky shore intertidal systems, and the marshland ecosystems offered at HMSC. With this and additional training, I am investigating how people utilize their time in an aquarium setting at the Oregon Coast Aquarium. Based upon the information I’m gathering from tracking visitors and noting what visitors are observing in the Swampland exhibit, further work will lead to the development of a survey to understand what aquarium visitors are learning about the swampland ecosystems. I am also conducting visitor observations to note their preferences for traditional signage or digital for exhibits. In addition, I plan to create lesson plans for first grade classes in Pennsylvania, using the state standard requirements for science to integrate informal science lessons into the formal classroom.

Shawn Rowe, Marine Education Learning Specialist/Assistant Professor, Oregon State University/Sea Grant Extension
2008

Amanda Colton

Internship through NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

University of New England - Biddeford, Maine/ Marine Biology & Environmental Sciences

Title: Visual and olfactory cues leading to aggregations of Pacific cod and walleye pollock in prey patches

Summary: I studied the role that visual and olfactory cues play in aiding larval Pacific cod and walleye pollock locate and remain within patches of high prey concentration. Behavioral responses of larvae were examined in two types of experiments. "Gradient Trials" evaluated the behavioral responses of fish to uneven distributions of light, prey scent, and live prey. In "Patch Trials", I determined if larvae alter their swimming behaviors when in a feeding patch. Overall, I found that the two species have very similar foraging mechanisms, which include an ontogenetic reversal in the behavioral response to light gradients and a strengthening responsiveness to prey. Larvae of neither species exhibited a behavioral response to prey scent, suggesting that olfaction in prey detection may be restricted to later life stages in these species.

Tom Hurst, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA - Alaska Fisheries Science Center
2006 Angie Sremba Kalamazoo College - Kalamazoo, Michigan/ Biology Comparison of ingestion rates of the euphausiid Euphausia pacifica on five types of phytoplankton.  Calculated ingestion and filtration rates of E. pacifica and the effects on the percentage of body carbon consumed per day by the euphausiids.  This study confirmed that E. pacifica can consume particles as small 2 µm, enabling them to exploit a wide range of food types in the ocean. Bill Peterson, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
2004 Ashley Emerson Mount Holyoke College - South Hadley, MA/ Biology Looking at fish larvae as an indicator of climate change. Sorting samples from the Newport line at the NH05 station and determining which species of fish larvae/fish eggs are present. Bill Peterson, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Angela Lee Foreman University of California-Davis Study of the contaminant effects on immunologically challenged marine organisms, using juvenile Chinook salmon as a model. Experiments involved exposing fish to different concentrations of the Listonella anguillarum bacteria to better understand how the fish immune system reacts with metabolites and how it alters the immune function. Mary Arkoosh, Microbiologist/Immunologist; NOAA/NMFS/EC
Kelly "Betsy" Glaesemann Texas A&M University - Galveston, Texas/ Marine Biology Working on the size-specific sediment preference of English sole. Previous work has been done with Pacific halibut & northern rock sole sediment preference, but little is known regarding English sole. Understanding their sediment preference furthers knowledge of their essential fish habitat. Cliff Ryer, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Kristina Johnson Wake Forest University - Winston-Salem, North Carolina/ Biology My project involved performing a survey of fish parasites among yearling and subyearling chinook and coho salmon collected in June and September 2002. I compared north-south trends for June, as well as a temporal trend (June vs. September) for the Columbia River transect. As for a north to south trend, I found that the trematode we have been calling Deropagus (the ID is still in flux) is more abundant south of the Columbia River transect, while the trematode Lecithaster is more abundant in the north. Temporally, the Columbia River fish had less total parasites (especially no Deropagus or Lecithaster trematodes), but more of the trematode Podocotyle. There were roughly the same number of nematodes in the Columbia River fish for both June and September. Kym Jacobson, Biologist, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
2003 Katie Chapman Bowdoin College Experiment data entry and fish lab work Robert Emmett, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Tara Duffy University of Dayton Activity patterns of juvenile northern rock sole Thomas Hurst, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Mary Kvitrud Luther College, Minnesota Genetic Identification in Scat Resolves Species and Number of Salmon Consumed by the Pacific Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina) Michael Banks, OSU Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station
Jeffery Muir University of Hawaii, Hilo Assisted with all field work - Ocean surface trawling and estuary purse seining. Also performed lab analysis - removed otoliths, stomachs, and other dissections. Robert Emmett, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Inia Mariel Soto Ramos University of Puerto Rico Affinity by English sole for emergent benthic structure. Cliff Ryer, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
2002            Lewis Barnett  Oregon State University Effect of ambient illumination on the behavioral response of juvenile English sole to disturbance by a bottom trawl footrope Cliff Ryer, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Olivier Drean  Caen University, France  Description and analysis of shell morphologies of the Pacific oyster  Chris Langdon, OSU Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station
Erin Jackson  University of New Mexico Sound in the Sea: Marine mammal acoustics of the Pioneer Seamount hydrophone  Dave Mellinger, OSU Cooperative Institute for Marine Resource Studies
Mary Kvitrud   Luther College, Minnesota Genetic Identification of Salmonid Species from Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina) Scat. Michael Banks, OSU Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station
Emily Locke  ?  Jack mackerel abundance and feeding habits  Robert Emmett, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Kara M. Rehmke  Oregon State University  Analysis of gut content and stable isotope signatures of several species of fish collected on the Astoria Canyon 2000 cruises Ric Brodeur and Keith Bosely, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
 Nick Tagliavento  Oregon State University  Comparison methods for assessing the abundance of juvenile flatfish in shallow water bays and estuaries  Al Stoner, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Adriana Veloza  East Stroudsburg University  Effects of turbidity upon foraging by plantivorous juvenile marine fishes Cliff Ryer and Alex Derobertis, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Whitney Weston  Community College, Roseburg, Oregon  Captive breeding: conflict between maintaining genetic variation and loss of behavioural fitness  Michael Banks and Ian Fleming, OSU Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station
2001  Chris Cochran   ?  Life history of whitebait smelt off the mouth of the Columbia River  Robert Emmett, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Liz Davis ? The Abundance and Feeding Habits of Surf Smelt in the Lower Columbia River Estuary: May-September 2001  Robert Emmett, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Chanda Jones University of Texas, Corpus Christi Effects of streptomycin upon functioning of the teleost lateral line system: is there a motivational effect? Cliff Ryer, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
 2000  Elizabeth Shimps  North Carolina State University  Effects of fish size upon foraging in the dark: discordance with visually based foraging models  Cliff Ryer, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
 1999  James Douglas  Rice University  ?  Robert Emmett, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
 1998    Amy Chiuchiolo  Boston College  Growth depensation in juvenile marine fishes  Sue Sogard, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
 Angela Lawton  Lawrence University  Functional response of juvenile walleye pollock Theragra chalcogramma and sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria under low light and dark conditions  Cliff Ryer, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
 Cascade Sorte  ?  
Publication: Sorte, C. J., W. T. Peterson, C. A. Morgan, and R. L. Emmett. 
2001. Larval dynamics of the sand crab, Emerita analoga, off the central Oregon coast during a strong El Niño period. J. Plankton Res. 23(9):939-944. 

Publication: Sorte, C. J., W. T. Peterson, C. A. Morgan, and R. L. Emmett. 2001. Larval dynamics of the sand crab, Emerita analoga, off the central Oregon coast during a strong El Niño period. J. Plankton Res. 23(9):939-944. 

 Robert Emmett, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
 1997   Ricardo Lopez   University of Alaska, Fairbanks  Functional responses and effects of prey size upon the non-visual foraging of juvenile walleye pollock Theragra chalcogramma  Cliff Ryer, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
 Torie Wesby  Savannah State University  Effects of competition on growth rates in juvenile marines fishes  Sue Sogard, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
 1996  Dean Marshall   Savannah State University  Effects of illumination on interactions between a juvenile marine planktivorous fish and its predators  Cliff Ryer, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
 1994  Sheena Ballard  University of Maryland, Eastern Shore  Temperature limitation of growth in juvenile marines fishes  Sue Sogard, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
 1993  Simone Brooks  Hampton University  Social facilitation as a mechanism controlling the onset and maintenance of shoaling in juvenile sablefish  Cliff Ryer, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center