Intern Home Institution Major Project Mentor
Christian Andresen University of Texas El Paso- El Paso, Texas Environmental Sciences Researching the genetic basis of adult run timing differences for fall and spring Chinook from the same watershed. Characterizing genetic sequence variation for one of the clock genes called cry. There are seven copies of cry in zebrafish and likely twice this number in Chinook. Working on the 5th copy we have discovered.  Michael Banks, Professor of Fisheries and Wildlife
Alexandra Cwalina Stony Brook University - Stony Brook, New York Geological Oceanography
Analysis of the effects of surface heating, winds, and shelf circulation on temperature in the coastal ocean off Oregon. 
Through use of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Gliders, also known as Slocum gliders, we can collect data for a longer and less interrupted time period to determine the ocean circulation and understand the evolution of temperature in the coastal ocean. In effect, local fishing communities will be better informed of the area's physical state while the science community will gain a greater understanding of the variability of temperature in the coastal ocean. 

Analysis of the effects of surface heating, winds, and shelf circulation on temperature in the coastal ocean off Oregon. 
Through use of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Gliders, also known as Slocum gliders, we can collect data for a longer and less interrupted time period to determine the ocean circulation and understand the evolution of temperature in the coastal ocean. In effect, local fishing communities will be better informed of the area's physical state while the science community will gain a greater understanding of the variability of temperature in the coastal ocean. 

Kipp Shearman, Assistant Professor, College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences
Stefanie Gera College of Wiliam and Mary - Williamsburg, Virginia Biology & Environmental Science

Determining migratory history of juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) along the Oregon coast using otolith increment and mirochemical analysis as an indicator of life history patterns and growth rate.

Otoliths, like tree rings contain increments that reflect changes in environments.  We studied how growth rate and a particular chemical marker Strontium (Sr) varied in each of the three habitats used by steelhead during their lifecycle: freshwater, brackish water and ocean water in order to reconstruct life history profiles. 

Jessica Miller, Assistant Professor, OSU Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station
Ethan Herget Portland State University- Portland, Oregon Organismal Biology A comparative analysis of visitor experiences and expectations at 4 informal learning sites: Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area tide pools, Seal Rock State Park tide pools, Oregon Coast Aquarium touch pool and Hatfield Marine Science Center Visitors Center touch pools.  This work will provide much needed data on the differences in use of natural and human built tide pool environments for free-choice learning. Shawn Rowe, Marine Education Learning Specialist/Assistant Professor, OSU Sea Grant Extension
Rose Kormonyos Whitman College- Walla Walla, Washington Biology Researching how annual growth increments in long-lived geoduck clam shells provide a record of ocean climate, much the same way that tree rings provide a record of terrestrial climate. We are working on chronologies from two sites in the north Pacific, with preliminary results that geoduck growth may provide an excellent record of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation over the last 100 years. Bryan Black, Assistant Professor, OSU/Hatfield Marine Science Center
Patrick Luke Oregon State University - Corvallis, Oregon Fisheries & Wildlife Temporal patterns of larval ghost shrimp in Yaquina estuary. Ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis) are important ecological components of Pacific estuaries. Recruitment of ghost shrimp to estuarine tideflats is highly variable among years and the larval component of the life cycle of this species is poorly understood. Patrick Luke is continuously sampling zooplankton during the summer of 2006 near the mouth of Yaquina estuary to determine temporal patterns of abundance of early- and late-state larvae of ghost shrimp. These data will be compared with temporal patterns of adult ghost shrimp egg production, larval development, and post-larval recruitment to provide an improved understanding of the population dynamics of this ecologically and economically important benthic invertebrate. Anthony D'Andrea, OSU CEOAS; Brett Dumbauld, USDA-Agriculture Research Service; Ted DeWitt, US EPA-Pacific Coastal Ecology Branch
Alexandra Penny Brown University - Providence, Rhode Island Environmental Studies Working with researchers at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife studying the effects of rapid decompression of rockfishesduring capture using hook and line. Her research project will relate physical signs of barotrauma for various species at capture to internal injuries that may affect survival. Her project will be able to compare responses to barotrauma among different species and provide information directly applicable to current fisheries management problems in estimating mortality of discarded fish in several fisheries on the west coast.  Steve Parker, Assistant Professor, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Marine Resources Program and Bob Hannah, ODFW
Kate Ruck James Madison University - Harrisonburg, Virginia Biology

Growth rates and distributions of Euphausia pacifica off the Newport Line

Creating length frequency histograms for Euphausia pacifica that have been sampled off the Newport hydrographic line from 2001-2004.  These histograms are then used to estimate growth rates by following cohorts of animals as they grow from eggs to adults. Accurate growth rates will improve understanding of the energetics and ecology of a species that is such an important link in the aquatic ecosystem. 

Bill Peterson, Professor, Oceanography (Courtesy); NOAA – Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Joel Scheingross University of California - Berkeley, California Environmental Sciences & Geology Studying how physical factors such as light level, availability of food, temperature and turbulence affect the vertical position of larval Pacific Cod (a commercially important fish found throughout the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska). This information, will be used to improve our understanding of the distribution and recruitment patterns of Pacific Cod in response to changing environmental conditions. Tom Hurst, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA - Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Lillian Tuttle Centre Collete - Danville, Kentucky Biology & Philosophy Early ocean ecology of juvenile steelhead salmon (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as indicated by parasite communities. Steelhead salmon are anadromous trout native to the North American Pacific coast with all ten Oregon and Washington stocks either endangered or likely to become so.  Through analysis of the steelhead parasite community, we will compare differences in parasite species composition between various sites off the Oregon and Washington coasts, as well as gain important ecological information about the diet and movement of steelhead after their first few months at sea. Kym Jacobson, NOAA/NMFS/ Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Lauren Woods Ohio Wesleyan University - Delaware, Ohio Zoology Shrimp sex and blood sucker sex: Parasitic bopyrid isopod crustaceans extract hemolymph from their decapod crustacean hosts but broad variation in host weight losses with the weights of their parasites indicates that interactions between these bopyrids and their hosts are complex and likely to vary with parasite development. Lauren Woods is experimentally testing how bopyrid isopod infestations alter growth and sexual development in the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and mud shrimp Upogebia pugettensis beyond simple weight losses to partially resolve this relationship.  John Chapman, Research Associate, OSU Department of Fisheries and Wildlife